Single Binding on a Mini Quilt

Mini Quilt Binding TutorialWe all put double layers of fabric bindings on our larger quilts, but have you thought about using a single binding on a smaller quilt?  It’s quicker, flatter, and really–are you going to wear out those edges any time soon?  And if you do, won’t you just repair them?  That idea came from Gwen Marston, in one of her last workshops.  That idea — that a quilter would just repair them if they became worn — is why she uses single bindings on all her quilts.Mini Quilt Binding_1Start by squaring up your mini-quilt.  Yes, that is a gigantor square ruler, and I use it a lot, actually.Mini Quilt Binding_2Prepare your hanging corners, by cutting a larger square (for a 24″ quilt, I use a 5 1/2″ square), folding in half, diagonally, and pinning it in the upper corners of your mini, against the back, matching raw edges to the edge of your quilt.

Mini Quilt Binding_115a(Here’s what it looks like on another quilt, as my corners just disappeared on this one.)

Mini Quilt Binding_3Cut strips of fabric (lengthwise, if you can) about 1 1/2″ wide and the size of two sides.  Pin, then stitch on, using a 1/4-inch seam.

Mini Quilt Binding_6Repeat for upper and lower edges.  Pin and stitch, but watch out that you don’t veer off on those corners (I pin them).Mini Quilt Binding_5Mini Quilt Binding_7Square up the corner, and cut off the excess, both underneath (above) and on the outer edge (below).
Mini Quilt Binding_8While this looks angular, it isn’t.  Mini Quilt Binding_9Press binding out away from quilt.  Mini Quilt Binding_10Fold up lower edge, so the raw edge of the binding meets the raw edges of the quilt.Mini Quilt Binding_11Fold it up again, covering the raw edges of the quilt. Pin in place, and then repeat with the sides:Mini Quilt Binding_12Mini Quilt Binding_13Hand stitch all the way around, or if you are a confident quilter, you can use a glue stick to affix the binding edges down, then machine stitch.  I personally don’t like the machine stitching, as I think it makes the edges too rigid, but “To each his own,” said the Old Lady as she kissed the cow.  (My Dad used to say that all the time.)Mini Quilt Binding_14Here’s the corner already on, but it’s hard to see.  I cut a dowel the width of the quilt, minus 2″ and slip it into place. Then I hang my minis, balancing it on a push pin.Mini Quilt Binding_15Mini Quilt Binding_aThanks to all who came to the Trunk Show and to all who sent their best wishes.  It was a lovely evening!  If your guild would like to see my Abecedary of Quilts Trunk Show, just drop me a note.

Lanyard Tutorial for Quilt Shows

lanyard_hangingI didn’t have a lanyard last year at QuiltCon, and my pins slipped and slid everywhere, beside the fact that I jingle-jangled as I walked.  I wanted one of those spiffy ones, where I could pin on my pins.

lanyard_1

I patchworked up a strip 3 3/4″ wide and 37″ long, took it to my ironing board and pressed it in half, lengthwise. lanyard_2

Open it up, and to one side of the center fold, lay down a 1″ wide by length-of-lanyard strip of fusible interfacing; iron that into place. lanyard_3

Fold both raw edges in, almost to the center, but not quite.  The side with the interfacing should be folded over that interfacing, and the side without interfacing should match when all folded up.  With the interfacing UP (not to the feed dogs), stitch first along one long side about 1/4″ away from the fold, then the other.  Make sure you’ve caught all the folded edges when you stitch it down.  Then stitch down the center. lanyard_4

Arrange the strips so that it will hang around your neck (see top photo), then mis-align the lower raw edges, setting the top one 1/4″ beyond the bottom strip.  Slip on the lanyard clasp. lanyard_5

Zigzag the extended top strip over the bottom strip, to hold it in place. lanyard_6

(View from the underside)

Again, for ease in wearing, slightly splay the two strips apart, then stitch along the finished ends (refer to photos). lanyard_7

(View from the top side)

lanyard_heartYes, I’m headed to QuiltCon West 2016 this week (held in Pasadena, California), along with some friends from the Good Heart Quilters, the small monthly sewing group I belong to here (which is why there is heart fabric on our lanyards).

1QuiltCon2016Classes

That Friday night class is taught by Jacqueline Sava.  I hope to meet a lot of my online friends, trying to make “real” the digital friendships I’ve enjoyed.  There should be more than a few a whole mess of photos on my Instagram feed (button is to the right).  If you are going, find me and swap me a button!

Button for QuiltShows

Wonky Baby Baskets and Narrow Stem Applique

Vietnam War Memorial Statuette

(momentos left at the Wall–I am grateful to those who have fought in service of our country.)Arlington Cemetary Mem DayHappy Memorial Day, to those of you who are in the United States.  We spent a year back in Washington, DC some time ago, where I toured every monument I could (going to the Vietnam Wall on Memorial Day and waving on the East Coast Rolling Thunder motorcycle riders on the bridge near the Lincoln Memorial; today I’ll be waving on the West Coast Rolling Thunder).  I also joined a lovely little quilt guild, named the Mt. Vernon Chapter of Quilters Unlimited (which covered the entire state of Virginia), where I learned this technique.

Basket Blocks Quilt Top

I recently made a wonky basket quilt with some baby baskets (below).  Here’s some basic guidelines for the baby baskets.

Baby Baskets

Baby Basket Dimensions

Follow the directions for the Wonky Baskets, cutting the base pieces smaller, as the finished size is shown above.  So maybe cut the upper part in the 5″ by 3″ range, and the lower part the same (it will be bigger after you splice in the basket).

Sewing the handles mini baskets

Follow the instructions for the bias strips for the bigger basket, but sew these narrower–about 3/8″ wide.  I’m using leftover handles strips for the big baskets. The woman who taught me this. in our Mt. Vernon Guild, made very narrow stems for her flowers by using this method.  So I call this the Narrow Stem Method.

trimming the handles baby basketsTrim close to inner stitching.

pinned handles baby baskets

Laying the basket below (to gauge for the width), pin on the handles with the raw edges facing towards the outside.  Place the handle edges at least 1/2″ inside the basket to allow for turning.

Narrow Stem Applique 1

Stitch on sewing line.

Narrow Stem Applique 2

Narrow Stem Applique 3

Now press the bias strip outward–letting the fabric fall back over the stitched line and the raw edges.

Narrow Stem Applique 4

Narrow Stem Applique 5Stitch down both edges, then finish block as for the bigger wonky block.   If you were doing a stem, you would hand-stitch down that outer edge invisibly.

Trim as shown in above photo–to 4 1/2″ by 5 1/2″.  I combined two to fill out those rows without the wider basket blocks.

Dumpling Bags

I had some leftover little baskets, so used them to make tiny Dumpling Bags, using a free pattern from Michelle Patterns.

Basket Blocks in the garden

WWII Lincoln Memorial One of my favorite memorial sites in Washington, D. C.  

My mother remembers this day not just for the Veterans, thinking instead of its original purpose: that of taking a day to remember our own deceased relatives.  She still calls it “Decoration Day.” My parents would go around to all the graves of their deceased ancestors and leave flowers.

Memorial Day 2014

I went up last year to see them on this weekend, but they’d already done most of the graves.  I did get to go with them for a couple of my great-grands, my father anchoring the pot of mums with bamboo skewers so it wouldn’t tip over.

Mother

This week is also my mother’s 87th birthday, and so I celebrate her as well.
Happy Birthday, Mom!

 

Baskets Finished!

Basket Blocks Quilt Top

You know, I think I have had more fun with this little quilt than I have in a long time.  Of course, maybe the fact that last Monday I taught my last class of the semester may have something to do with it.  (At church this past week, I was flanked by two K-12 teachers from two different districts, and they knew practically to-the-minute how long before school let out for the summer.)

Baskets wo border

Here they are without the borders.

Border Try One

The suggestion I’d seen for a border was a piano key border, so I whacked up a bunch of 6″ wide, random-width strips and put them together.  I just couldn’t figure out why I didn’t like it.  I thought it was the fact that there were a lot of light-colored pieces in there.  So I ripped all the borders apart (which is why I have a photo of only one border–on the bottom) and took out the lights.  Still didn’t like it.

I had this older piece of blue fabric laying on the board so I could cut it up for darker “keys” for the piano key border, and pinned it up to the quilt and liked it!  Not quite enough, so I pieced in some random pieces to hint at the idea of a piano key border, and went with it.

Baby Baskets

Tutorial for the big baskets is *here.*  Tutorial for the baby baskets is in the next post.

Wonky Basket Blocks Tutorial

Wonky Baskets MCM

Carla, of Grace and Favour, asked us to make Wonky Baskets for her bee month for May 2015  Mid-Century Modern Bee.  She sent us some photos of examples of Gwen Marston’s Liberated Baskets and gave us instructions to make colorful baskets with contrasting handles.  I just found my way to completion.  I thought I’d share how I proceeded.

Wonky Baskets_nine

This is a result of the process called “Grading Avoidance.”  (My final papers just came in and I run upstairs in between each paper and play with the cloth to get my brains back.  It’s a skill I’ve learned since becoming a professor.)

Baskets Quilt

Carla’s request reminded me of a quilt I saw last summer in the Springville Art Museum, Going to Market, by PJ Medeiros (quilted by Amity Golding).

Baskets Detail

I liked all the different-sized baskets, so I drew up this sketch:

Wonky Baskets_size options

Wonky Baskets_pair up fabrics

I then pulled up a bunch of two-fabric combinations and laid them all out on my ironing board, and started to cut.

Wonky Baskets_cutting

Wonky Baskets_cutting2

This is how I assemble the basket part, beginning with the bottom piece (or base piece).  I lay the basket piece on top, about 2″ from the edge, and placing the ruler at a slant, I cut through both the LEFT base and the basket pieces.  Shift the basket piece to the left so it overlaps the righthand base piece by about two inches, then lay your ruler down on a slant, and cut through both pieces.  I show you how it looks once you are finished (above).

Wonky Baskets_ready to sew

Pin and stitch, then press towards the basket.

Wonky Baskets_cutting3

Lay the upper piece and the newly constructed basket bottom piece together, then measure about 11″ from where you will cut the base; place a pin.  This is the outer boundaries for the handle.

To make the handles, cut a bunch of bias strips anywhere from 1 -1/4″ to 1-1/2″ wide.  Fold in half, wrong sides together, long cut edges aligned and stitch a narrow (1/8″ seam).

Wonky Baskets_bias pressing

I have these bias strip press bars that help me with the next step: I slide them in, wiggle the seam to the middle back and press.  You can just do this with your fingers on your ironing board.  Try really hard not to stretch out your bias.

Wonky Baskets_sewing handles

The above weensy picture (click to enlarge) shows me 1) auditioning bias strips for the handle (I have a bunch to choose from ).  Go to the ironing board and press, with steam, a curve into your handle, then pin it on (photo below).  It’s better to think about easing in the inside curve, rather than stretching the outside curve, but truthfully, both happen at the same time.

Then back to the above photo: 2) stitch on the handle, doing the inside curve first, then the outside curve; 3) handle stitched, and finally 4) the seam between the upper and lower parts are stitched and trimmed.

Winky Baskets_handle pinned

Wonky Basket_final

For the final press, press seam toward basket so the handle will look like it’s coming out of the basket.

Wonky Baskets_stacks

I cut and stacked a bunch so I could slide up here between grading and sew a couple.  Bias strips are in the front.

Wonky Baskets_ten

And now I have ten!  You can see I’ve made one of them bigger.  I also have a couple of midget baskets ready to make, too, to even out the rows.  I’m just making them–I’ll figure out how to put them into a quilt later, after these last essays are graded, the final given and grades assigned.  A perfect summer project, I think.