Happy Fourth of July 2018

Fourth July Tiny Quilt

To honor the 4th of July, I stitched up another tiny quilt.  I love being patriotic, as the meaning has a sense of loving America and its peoples, the history and the early settlers, and those who set up the government in 1776.  It helps that my nickname in my childhood was Betsy, but I do love the red, white and blue.

Fourth July Tiny Quilt_1

I went through my Orphan Quilt Blocks box, found one that wasn’t being used, and smallerized it, using this PDF pattern to cut it out: Fourth July Tiny Quilt Star Center

Fourth July Tiny Quilt_2

I put on two borders, quilted it (so fast because it’s so small) and put a single-thickness binding on it (cut your strip 1-1/2″ wide), gluing down the back binding and top-stitching it down.  It is one of those quilt projects you can take at full throttle–no fussy cutting or intricate piecing.  Put your pedal to the medal and crank out a 4th of July star tiny quilt!

Fourth July Tiny Quilt_back

It slips over the back of one of those cheezy plastic stand picture frames (under 2 bucks at Walmart). [More on the quilt underneath it at the end of the post.]

Tiny Sailboat Quilt_front on frame

Here’s a post with general directions as well as how to make a sailboat design.
And I have also made:

Mini Quilt Spring 18_4

a snowman,

Tiny Pumpkin Quilt_front

a harvest pumpkin, (which has more directions, especially on that binding)

Tiny Trees

and some Christmas trees. (I included the directions for the smaller trees.)

AmericaIsATune_frontAmericaIsATune_backAmericaIsATune_label

 

I made the quilt above quilt five years ago at the same time we had a government shut-down, and I was moaning about government needing to behave itself then.  I now look back on that particular chaos with a wistful glance; would that we had that steadiness now!

Shout Hurrah for America

Yet, I still believe that America is a Tune, and that we must figure it out — sing it — together, no matter how painful things are.  After reading the book Hamilton, I value what those early fathers of our country (and mothers, too) must have faced and appreciate how much work they did and how inspired they were to come together and get the framework off the ground.

Uncle Sam

Have a Happy Fourth of July!

 

Tiny Tree and Teeny Trees

Tiny Trees

I’m decorating for Christmas and wanted to change out my Tiny Quilt from Autumn to Christmas, but then got wondering how a teeny-weeny quilt would look, so got busy.  These little quilts fit onto plastic picture frames:

I have two free patterns for you here, but please remember the drill: Don’t print off umpteen for your next class, or guild meeting swap or your mother.  Please send them here to get their own pattern.

The teeny tree (4×6″) pattern is in this downloadable PDF file:Teeny Christmas Tree quilt

The tiny tree (8×10″) pattern is in this downloadable PDF file:Tiny Christmas tree quilt

As you can see from the samples I made up, I play fast and loose with some of the placement of pieces, really using them more as a guideline for cutting, than anything else (although I did cut out the tree exactly).

Tiny Tree_1

Cut out all the pieces for the pattern you’ve chosen.  As I noted above, sometimes I used the pattern (shown here before I added the labels) as sort of a general guidelines.  You need an accurate tree, and a nice straight edge where you’ll sew it to the tree (the diagonal line in the photo, above).Tiny Tree_2

I sewed the “sky” pieces to the sides of the trunks then trimmed the edge that would attach to the tree.  More detailed tutorial is also on my OTHER Christmas Tree block tutorial, which is sized somewhere in between these two tree sizes. (I should open up a Christmas Tree lot with all these patterns.)Tiny Tree_3

Sew the “right” side onto the tree.  Make sure you keep the marked top triangle point pointing upwards.

Tiny Tree_4a

Trim any stray areas (above), then add the other side.

Tiny Tree_5

Straighten out the bottom of the tree assembly.  Center, then sew on the tree-trunk unit, pressing seam towards tree (so it looks like the trunk is under the tree).Tiny Tree_6a

Now to add the snowdrifts on the little tree.  On the left, I sort of place that wedge-shaped piece, determine the angle but flipping it up and down (on the right).  When I have the angle I like, flip it back up so right sides are together, and stitch along the upper edge.  Trim.Tiny Tree_6b

Repeat for lower snowdrift.  Trim excess.

Tiny Tree_7
For the bigger tree, I added on 2″ strips to frame the tree.  It needed something to jazz it up, so I got rid of the bottom strip on the pattern and just used strips all around.Tiny Tree_7a

Layer with batting and backing and quilt.  I did a meander in the sky area around the trees, then some straight lines in the snowdrift on the teeny tree, and some straight lines in the frame around the bigger tree:

Tiny Tree_8a

I also quilted some swirls in the center of the tree.Tiny Tree_8b

Time to trim.  The teeny trees trim to 4-3/4″ by 6-1/2″ and the larger tree is trimmed to 8-3/4″ by 10-1/2.”

Tiny Tree_9

Make a sleeve for the back by cutting a piece the same size as the quilt top, but then hem the lower edge, turning it up twice and top-stitching.  I know it’s hard to see in this print, but again, feel free to check out the other tutorials of tiny quilts.Tiny Tree_10a

I brought out my Blythe doll and one of my husband’s nutcrackers to pose by the quilts.

Tiny Tree_10bTiny Tree_110c

Looks like Blythe has the hots for the Santa skier. And here I thought she’d go for the more traditional guy:

Blythe and King

He does look a little formal.  Hmmm.  Evidently not her type.

Okay, that’s enough–I’m off to sew!

(Buttons added!)