Made to Withstand the Proof of Time

from here; more about this in a minute

As quilters, we have an relationship to time. We begin something, knowing it won’t be done for days, or months or even years. We work towards a daily or weekly goal of finishing the quilt, even though we might sometimes abandon the effort. But there is always this gap from beginning to end.

I started this quilt in December 2015, the design inspiration taken from an antique red and white quilt I’d seen in a quilt show. I couldn’t figure out how that quilting sister from 150 years ago put her quilt together, so I modernized it, and then in January 2016 sent the instructions to a bee I was in, asking them to make some blocks. Then I made more blocks, thinking about how that woman so long ago might envy our ability to have such an array of fabrics, to sew like the wind on our modern machines, to have such a distant circle of friends still gather together in a quilting bee.

I wrote about the finished quilt top, and then it sat. Time passed.

I wrote a pattern, but when QuiltMania accepted the quilt for publication, I took it down from my PayHip shop.

Time passed. And then some more time.

This week I received this picture in an email, along with the picture of the cover:

From December 2015 to August 2020 is nearly five years. In that time I’ve counted off changes in our family, health issues, deaths in our family, births and birthdays, personal highs, and personal challenges, a pandemic and now extremely grateful to have a quilt published in a respected quilt magazine. And to quote a common phrase seen in our quilty culture: I have #allthefeels.

Which brings me back to that photo at the top of this page. Several designers and architects were asked to “reflect on a changing world, their creative process, and the future of design.” I enjoyed reading their thoughts, as they echoed some of my own feelings about the creative life. Here’s two:

Pierre Yovanovitch (Provence, France) said: “I try to look at the silver lining and see this as an opportunity for a creative reset, taking a pause from our overly scheduled lives to tap back into what inspires us.”

Milanese designers Laura Sartori Rimini and Roberto Peregalli, who designed the room of plates at the top of the post:

“Regarding the future effects of this pandemic, on one hand it has been recognized the importance of the house as a center, a place of the soul in people’s life. On the other hand, the inevitable economic impact that will follow this situation will, we hope, generate among people the idea that the house isn’t just an object that follows the trends to be discarded and replaced for the next upcoming thing. You should aim for an object of beauty, made to withstand the proof of time.”

I guess that’s why we quilters are willing to start a quilt in December and nearly five years later, see it completed. That’s why we pick out fabrics and squirrel them away, knowing that sometime in the future — maybe even in a pandemic — we will pull out the projects we’ve collected and start the long process in the midst of the distraction, the sorrow, the uncertainty.

And as always, we will send our quilt out into the world as a veritable declaration of hope, our handiwork created to withstand the proof of time.

Happy quilting. Yes, especially now.

Gridster Bee Blocks & Catch-Ups

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Gridster_Septemeber Teton

Simone, the Queen Bee for September, visited Grand Teton National Park over the summer and wanted a block to commemorate her visit.  I can hardly wait to see this one.

Gridster_October African QueenLeisa’s mother used to live in Ghana, a missionary for the LDS church.  While she was there, she sent Leisa a box of fabrics that she’s turned into African Queen blocks.  In case you want one, here’s the info on the pattern by Anne Batiste.

I also saw Leisa’s block in my latest Quiltfolk Magazine, issue #4:

Quiltfolk Issue 4Quiltfolk Issue 4aI have to admit, even though it’s a bit more than I’d usually pay for a single issue, I do enjoy this publication, as it generally focuses on the regular people of quilting, not the big Brand Names of Quilt Stardom.  A nice change, which exposes me to a wider range of our quilt world (and lets me find an African Queen pattern!).

Uppercase_35

Here’s another I really enjoy–Uppercase Magazine.  This issue hit it out of the park, in my view, so if you decide to subscribe, make sure you start with #35.  Neither of these publications have advertisements, they are subscription based only, which is why they cost a bit more: the advertisers aren’t subsidizing the costs.  I like advertisements okay; it helps me know what my favorite companies are doing.  But I also like not having advertisements, too.

If you join up with Jeanine’s mailing list, she’ll give you a deal on a new subscription, plus you get her cool little missives.  Never heavy, only intriguing and fun, filled with art and creativity everywhere.  I’m sure you can sign up to get those all by themselves, if you want.  (And no, Uppercase doesn’t pay me.)

Okay, as long as we are in the panting-over-something-but-don’t-know-if-I’ll-get-it phase, look what came in my mailbox this morning:

QuiltMania box set Di Ford

You get one box at a time, filled with stuff to make two Di Ford blocks.  I’m not even a Di Ford aficionado (although you might persuade me) and I’m tempted.  They are only making 400.

This news comes from someone who has the complete set of Frivols, yes, boxes 1-12.  It was my retirement gift to myself.  I still haven’t made ONE of those quilts, although I still like seeing the boxes.  Soon.

My box fetish comes honestly from my mother, who always had a cupboard full of empty boxes for gift-giving, and a stack of them outside in the garage next to the freezer, just in case we needed one.  I’m sure there are other box-hoarders out there, besides me, right?

4-in-art_3

Coming November 1st: my final quilt in the Four-in-Art experience.  Although I’ll not be a part of it, the art quilt group still continues on, however, as Endeavourers, with Janine and Catherine at the helm.

 

Endeavourer

They had such a nice response that their slots are full, but having run a few groups, I know that the line-ups change all the time.  If you are interested in joining them, drop either one of them a note and ask to be added to their waiting list.  It has been a wonderful experience to make art quilts these past five years, and being a part of a group is wonderful.

See you November 1st!

 

Elizabeth’s Lollypop Trees Hit Print!

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The Lollies hit print!  Diane, a reader of this blog, recently sent me a note telling me that my quilt was in QuiltMania’s May-June issue.  I thought it might be a pitch for Kim McLean’s fine pattern, so at first I didn’t think it was mine.  She wrote back: “It’s yours!” and then she sent me photos to prove it.

I about fell over.

Eastmond_QuiltMania_2Bless you, Diane, for letting me know (as I received no notice from the magazine).  It was a part of a spread for Road to California this past year, and I was thrilled to be included in this article.  I ordered a copy from Fat Quarter Shop and it arrived via post today.  What a lovely surprise!