Uncle (Frivols #8)

The following pictures tell you why I’m saying Uncle on this project, as there is No Way I’m going to be able to quilt it and bind it and label it, all before the end of August.  Which is tomorrow, in case you didn’t notice.

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Cutting.  And I only made one mistake.  Not bad, not bad.

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What is with all these half-square triangles in everyone’s design?  HSTs! HSTs!  AAAAGH!

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I got one block this far late one night, then went to bed.

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The next day I got this far, all while listening to Book 4 of Bruno, Chief of Police.  And that little habit is all due to Bette, who suggested I might like them.  I do. The real title of that book was the Devil’s Cave.  Our hero, Bruno, saved the day.Frivols 8_9

Twenty-nine thousand pieces of sashing, and eight million borders are sewn on. It’s actually looking cuter.

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It kind of like died here.

I cut the batting last night, organized (but didn’t sew together) the backing.  But I had to finish up another quilt, and take photos, and meet a bazillion deadlines, the least of which is to revamp this entire room, which used to be the guest room, but will soon become our office.  Well, mostly my husband’s, but I will have a desk too, and all our modemrouterprinter1printer2extrapaperofficesupplies will soon leave my sewing room and live here.  Can’t wait.  See me about November for the finished product/project.

I’ll get to the Frivols #8, but just not by August 31st.  But I did try.

Cartoon Fabric Buying

 

South Bay Quilters Guild visit

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Last week, I had a great time, visiting and teaching with the South Bay Quilters Guild, with a meeting on Tuesday evening (August 21) and a workshop on Wednesday.

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My hostess for the event was the ever lovely Melanie, the VP of Programs.  I arrived at her house in Torrance in the afternoon, where we visited before I freshened up and we headed to the meeting, held in Redondo Beach.

First up (after a fine dinner at a local restaurant, where I was able to meet several guild members) is set up, and above you can see my quilts, all laid out in order.  I think I brought 40 quilts, a mixture of large and small, for my Quilt Abecedary trunk show.

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Once I was ready, I strolled around their guild as they have a “happy hour” before the meeting starts.  Their Opportunity Quilt for their annual quilt show is shown above, titled Jovial French Bluebirds.  Their quilt show is February 16-17 in 2019–I’m impressed that they do this every year.

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She wore her handmade costume for Show and Share. You should have seen her shoes!

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They made flowers for all the Board Members to wear, so that people could find them easily if they had questions (I blurred out their names).

I did my Trunk Show and from the looks on people’s faces, they were engaged — it was a most satisfying experience.  Then the meeting went on to business, and the installation of their new board for the year, as this was the first meeting of the year.  They have an ambitious slate of classes and events, and an enthusiastic guild.

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South Bay Quilters Board

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After my talk, it’s always fun to see people look closely at the quilts.

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The next day we headed up to the Palos Verdes Library, where the workshop would be held.  I’m always impressed by art in public spaces, and this library was beautiful.  My workshop was Two-For-One, where I teach a small quilt of my own design and Free-Motion Quilting basics.

I set up my quilts and supplies in the classroom with the help of Sue, the Workshop Chair, and Melanie.  The classroom was spacious with a large bank of windows on one side, giving lots of light.  We got to work, and below are some of the results of the morning:

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FMQ kits for the afternoon

In the afternoon, we switched to free motion quilting, and after a series of nine separate lessons, many were feeling comfortable with the technique.  I enjoyed how positive everyone was, as well as interested in learning a new skill.SouthBayQuilters_9

By the end of the workshop time, everyone was tired and ready to go home.  I snapped this photo upstairs as we were ready to head to the parking level: the sun had come in through an atrium, shining through to the sphere.

Thank you, South Bay Quilters, for a wonderful time!

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Now this is fun! Annularity hits print

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I’ve been waiting for this, and even though I still don’t have my paper, in-the-hand catalogue…hooray!  my quilt, Annularity, has hit print.  This is a screenshot of the digital catalogue.

The direct link to this page in the Fall Keepsake Quilting catalogue will allow you to order yourself a kit, if you like.  I’ve made two of these…now it is your turn to play with color and with the cool Painter’s Palette Solids.  (Or, if you want, you can just order the pattern.)  Thanks, Keepsake!

Happy Quilting!

Northern Star Medallion Top Finished

 

Northern Star Quilt TopIt was a lot of mind over matter, but I finished the borders, worked out the measurements and sewed everything together.  There seemingly was a big canyon between where I was last post and where I am now: getting it ready to quilt, but really, it wasn’t that hard once I settled down, stopped freaking out and followed Melanie’s advice.

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I finished the Gridster Bee blocks for Linda for August.  I like her idea of lots of churn dashes all the same size, but in a variety of fabrics.  If you head to our hashtag on IG, you can see that Linda has already received some of the blocks.

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The same night I finished the Northern Star Medallion top, I stepped outside to see this.

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We drove up to the top of our neighborhood to see where the smoke was coming from–way over yonder in Orange County on the left bumpy mountain.  California is burning up, and it’s only the beginning of August.  When I first moved here 27 years ago, we only had fires in September, just like clockwork.  Every year there would be one big one, and then it would be done.

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Tonight the fire map looks like this and it’s not even September.  Oh yes, we also have an earthquake map, a smog map, but we don’t generally have snow or flood or tornado maps, like some of you do.

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This morning I had to have a couple of stitches taken out from a recent procedure, and the doctor was about to throw these into the sharps container.  When I asked, he gave them to me.  I washed them up and put them in my sewing supplies–those tweezers are great for grabbing the end of the seam of an HST to keep it from going wonky, and I’ll find a use for those scissors. Yes, I’m still sewing on my hexies.  I think I’m halfway there.

 


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Look at that yucky sky in the background–seems like it will be a good idea to stay inside and start quilting!

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The last time I worked on this, Neanderthals worked on chipping rocks for tools.
The last time I worked on this, Bing Crosby was crooning White Christmas.
The last time I worked on this, I had straight cut bangs and was in fourth grade.

Kidding.  But it has been a while.

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This is the fantasy version, done up in my favorite quilt software, Quilt Pro.

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The next ring was a series of Flying Geese.  I got the geese done and they didn’t fit.

Typical Medallion Quilt nonsense.

Those solid-color bands in between the pieces sections have many names, but Melanie, of Catbird Quilt Studio, also calls them Spacer Borders, and has a great blogpost on working with your pieced border and spacer borders to put the quilt together.  Another post of hers talks about designing medallion quilts in general, and is another great reference.

I wrote to her for advice (she really does know EVERYTHING about medallions and her blog is full of wonderful writing), and sent me a tiny example of how to do the math to figure it out:

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I did follow her instructions, trimmed some of the blue adjustment/spacer border, and the geese fit perfectly.  I also pinned them on a flat surface, working to keep the quilt square and not make any bubbles in the surface.

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Lovely night shot. It’s always late, lately.

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As per her advice, I cut the next border larger, and am now working on trying to get that last border to fit.

But this process this week has not been without some angst, as I first thought I was so smart to make a HST, cut that in half and then half again.  But that won’t work, as these last blocks have the colors in very specific places.

So I pulled out my triangle maker from Bonnie Hunter and started making the size I needed (I learned how to use her tool when I made her En Provence quilt in 2016-17).  Never let a new skill go wasted, or at least use it once in a while to keep it from totally slipping out of the old brain.

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In looking at the unit, I thought I would make the four-patch center, then adjoin the larger top/bottom triangles.  No.  It worked out better to create the unit above and sew them together.

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I splayed the back seams so the joins weren’t so bulky.

Now I’m auditioning adding another teal border on top of the green, or cutting down the green adjustment border to fit the pieced border.  I’m leaning toward the second one.

I thought these last sections would go more quickly, but I was quite bogged down the other night, trying to figure the dang thing out.  I’m back on track now, I guess.  Medallion quilts are one of my favorite quilts, but they can be tricky.

Last weekend we spent a few days up in the mountains of Southern Utah, feeling a bit too hot in the day, but blissful at night as we enjoyed the quiet and the breeze and a rare double-rainbow.  I also taught Free Motion Quilting to some of my relatives, as well as how to sew hexies.  They were receptive, and it was a weird thing to be sewing out in nature, but the cabin had electricity, and they wanted to learn.

Here’s to summer. Let’s hope I get this Northern Star Quilt done before the snow flies.