Road to California 2013–part II

The next two posts are photo-heavy, but I decided to put the quilts I wanted to show you up in two, rather than three posts. (BTW, these are in no particular order.)

AmerSpirit

Laurie Wozniak’s American Spirit, was one of several done for the American Spirit batting display, and for which they handed out calendars with photos of the quilts.  I liked the postage stamp theme.

ColoradoQuilt

Lynette Hallmark’s Colorado Evening was the other one in this series that caught my eye.

Bubble1

Bubble-Licious was made and quilted by Karla Dahms of Minnesota, and was inspired by the Beatle’s song “Octopus’ Garden,” from A Yellow Submarine.

Bubble2

Bubble3

ChignikQuilt

Artists Mark McDermott and Cat Larrea of Alaska, participated in a curated exhibit titled “Perspectives: Fantasy and Reality.”  This piece, Chignik Bay Lagoon, is a digital image of an original watercolor, which was then enlarged, printed on fabric and quilted.  Both artists have geoscience backgrounds.

Chignikdetail

CircularReasoning

Road to California always has a section of Faculty Quilts, and this very well-known quilt, Circular Reasoning, is by Emily Cier, and is quilted by Angela Walters.

CircularReasoningdetail

CityEdge1

City Edge 1 and 2 (this quilt and the next one) were made by Gerri Spilka and Delia Dungan and are from the Perspectives exhibit.  Both are from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and were inspired by their cityscape.

CityEdge2

FromStone

This quilt by Hollis Chatelain, From Stone, was inspired by a trip to beach near Brisbane, Australia. (from the Perspectives Exhibit)  Confession: I’m always in a love-hate relationship with her quilts.

MidTown1

MidTown A and B (this quilt and the next) were made by K. Velis Turan of New York.  She used fabric, dyes, textile paints, and. . . shrink plastic (what we used to call Shrinky-Dinks) for the cars.  Since so many of us have a love affair with big cities (but often are glad to retreat to the ‘burbs), I thought these quilts were terrific at showing the compressed space of buildings side-by-side, but sited on river-like boulevards.

Midtown2

Midtowndetail

CrazyPlaidQuilt

Allison Aller, another member of Road faculty, made Crazy for Plaid, her version of the traditional Gothic Windows pattern.  She used machine and hand embellishment (below, sorry for the blurry photo).

crazyPlaiddetail

GirlPearl

The main reason I was fascinated by Girl with a Pearl by the Sea, was because of that incredible mass of textured silk on the quilt.  Detail below.  Quilt made and quilted by Sandy Winfree. Can’t decide if I like it or not.  It’s a novelty quilt, and I think sometimes Road goes overboard on those.  Overall, I have to say I think this year’s Road offerings are better than last year’s.  Fewer sparkles for sparkles’ sake, for starters.

GirlPearldetail

GoneFishin1

Another sea-themed quilt (there were a lot of them this year) was this young boy swimming in a school of fishes.  Sylvia Clary of Florida, titled this Gone Fishing, and is apparently inspired by her real-life young grandson Carson.  It’s the details and whimsy of this quilt which drew me in.

GoneFishin2

Check out the use of selvages in this waves. The fish were made of her hand-dyed fabric, and this quilt included hand-painted, hand drawings duplicated for use, along with thread play, crystals (this is one quilt that I didn’t object to them being attached to, as they were used in the design, not to overwhelm the design) and lastly, photo collage.  It was a real treat, but as usual, my favorites don’t always get the ribbons.

GoneFishinBack

Ignore the words floating above this postcard, which was the back of the quilt.  Fabulous.

GoneFishingDetail

JenningsQuilt

Suzanne M. Riggio, maker and Terri Kirchner, quilter, both of Wauwatosa, Wisconsin (say that quickly) put together this “slice quilt” by the Milwaukee Art Quilters of an old home where they held their meetings.  The Jennings Homestead has applique, fusing, painting, inking, embroidery and discharge techniques.  Is anyone else wanting to do a “slice quilt”?  They are fascinating to me.

Jenningsdetail

JumpingQuilt

Jumping Off the Cliff with Freddy Moran, made by Kathryn Bernstein and Pam Dransfeldt of Los Angeles, California.  It’s fun to see Freddy influences in a quilt again.

Jumpingdetail

LoneStarburst

Another faculty quilt.  Lone Starburst was made by Kimberly Einmo and quilted by Birgit Schuller. Einmo wanted to create a quilt “one Jelly Roll Bundle plus one background fabric.”  She succeeded.

MonetQuilt

Monet in Pasadena, was made and quilted by Melinda Bula of California.  She used fusible applique and heavy thread play to create this quilt from her hand-dyed fabrics.  The inspiration was the Huntington Museum and Gardens in Pasadena, CA. Details below.

MonetDetail

Monetdetail2

Monetdetail3

NYStateQuilt

Two sisters, Sue Nickels and Pat Holly, made this quilt together (Sue quilted it).  It’s titled New York State of Mind, and is part of the faculty exhibit. Didn’t we used to call this orange color “cheddar”?

NYStatedetail

OldChina1

Old China was made and quilted by Nita Markos, and was inspired by a photo from her childhood.

OldChina2

OneFineDaydetail

I’m showing you the detail first on Cynthia England’s quilt, because it’s made of so many teeny tiny pieces.

OneFineDayQuilt

One Fine Day (from the faculty exhibit) was inspired by a photograph she took of Lake Tahoe, spending a day there with friends and her family,  a good “day to remember” she says.

OrganicLogCabindetail

The pieces in Organic Log Cabin #3, made and quilted by Jennifer Emry, were “scissor-cut. . . without measuring to get that ‘organic look.”

OrganicLogCabinQuilt

This one was fun to study.  Until I went to the other ballroom to see the quilts, it was about the only “modern” quilt in the exhibit.  Road trends toward the traditional, so I was happy to see a bit of a break-out here.

OutBoxQuilt

Another from the Perspectives exhibit was Out of the Box, by Sandra E. Lauterbach from Los Angeles California, and is based on a map of Shanghai, China.

PocketPaisley

Lorilynn King’s Pocket Full of Paisleys had a “private name” for the quilt while she was working on it (she called it her LOUD quilt).  She decided to learn her embroidery software, and used turquoise thread when testing.  She kept going and this was the result.  (As you may have noticed, some of these quilts are hard to photograph, because they either have signs on stands in front of them, clear plastic tape strung across, or the lighting and/or angles are a struggle to work with.)  I liked hearing that she had an “official name” for this quilt, and a “private name.”  I do the same thing, feeling like giving a quilt a name is sort of like naming a child–you can’t really know what that name is until the quilt is finished.

PocketPaisleydetail

Remick

Helen Remick had an alcove all to herself, showing off some of her quilts.  The one that caught my eye was YoYo 11: Reflections on Changing Technology.  She writes: “As one technology replaces another, some things are preserved, others lost.  CDs in yo-yos hold manuscripts, family history, rituals and vacations.  The collage on the back side is made from images and documents on these CDs.”

RemickQuilt1

RemickQuiltBack

RemickQuilt2

I also liked this one, but didn’t catch its name.  It evolves into yoyos at the border.

SecretGardenQuilt

Deborah Sorem’s My Secret Grandma’s Flower Garden has many allusions and references to her grandchildren in the quilt, and “represents three generations.”  Detail below.

SecretGardendetail

SolidsSign

Lupine designed and made by Emily Cier, quilted by Cathy Kirk

SolidsExhibit

I finished the exhibit in the main ballroom, and slipped over to the smaller ballroom, where I found this gem of a display by Robert Kaufman.  Of course, I read a lot of blogs by modern quilters, and this past weekend was QuiltCon–a modern quilt convention (next one is in two years!), so have been surprised that the organizers of Road haven’t yet made a nod to the influences of these quilt.  But here was a small exhibit of some amazing modern quilts.  One frustration was that none were labeled: not the maker, nor the title, which is a glaring oversight, I think. Enjoy the modernism of these quilts. Update:  Leanne of She Can Quilt emailed me all the correct titles.  I’ve amended the blog to add in this new information.

Leanne writes: “The quilts are all from the book called We Love Color, compiled by Susanne Woods, published by Stash Books.”  The one quilt not shown below (but shown above) is TV Color Bars Quilt, designed and made by Betz White.  I hope I put these in all the right places!

Solids1

Stepping Stones, designed and made by Lisa Call

Solids2

Orbit, designed and made by Jennifer Sampou, quilted by Angela Walters

SolidsQuilting

Solids3

Stacked Blankets, designed and made by Valori Wells

Solids4

Think Big, designed and made by Jacquie Gering, quilted by Angela Walters

Solids4a

Solids5

Sanibel designed and made by Weeks Ringle and Bill Kerr

Solids6

Modern Cross, designed and made by Kathy Mack

Solids7

Centered, designed and made by Cherri House, quilted by Angela Walters

Solids9

Color Frames, designed and made by Amy Ellis, quilted by Natalia Bonner

Solids10

Ladders, designed and made by Elizabeth Hartman

Solids11

Keys, designed and made by Alissa Haight Carlton

SolidsVendor

One of the vendors also had a touch of the modern in her display. This was Ginger’s Quilt Shop in Ontario, California, which I found a week later was closing its doors.  I was sad, because they’d been so helpful when I was making my Scrappy Stars quilt, in helping me figure out which color to use to back the stars.  I did go up to one of the closing days, picked up a slew of solids (I’d purchased a stack from them at the show), and said my good-byes to a great quilt shop.

Next post: last of Road to California quilts.

 

8 thoughts on “Road to California 2013–part II

  1. Thanks for sharing such a diverse group of quilts. After seeing all the modern QuiltCon quilts I’m hoping for two things. That big shows will be more inclusive of modern quilts and that modern quilters will open their minds to all genres of quilts and value the artistry and skill that goes into making each quilt. A given genre may not be my style but I still appreciate the effort involved. Working with fabric is what we all love and compulsively buy after all. I think I’m growing weary of the strict labels.

  2. Thank you for all the pictures. I have all those modern quilts in a book or two. Later I will find it and email you the information to give the credits.

  3. I love these posts of yours – I get to go to a quilt show far away and catch all the highlights! Thanks!

    It is a shame that they didn’t really acknowledge the modern quilts with names and makers – especially since that one is a cover quilt from a recent book. Oversight or intentional?

    I’ve seen slice quilts but never tried them – they are definitely intriguing though. Could make for a unique bee quilt…

  4. The quilts are all from the book called We Love Color, compiles by Susanne Woods, published by Stash Books. Starting with your picture which has the sign for the exhibit in it, the quilts are (where there are more than one in a picture, I went left to right):

    Lupine designed and made by Emily Cier, quilted by Cathy Kirk
    Sanibel designed and made by Weeks Ringle and Bill Kerr
    TV Color Bars Quilt, designed and made by Betz White
    Think Big, designed and made by Jacquie Gehring, quilted by Angela Walters
    Stacked Blankets, designed and made by Valori Wells
    Stepping Stones, designed and made by Lisa Call
    Orbit, designed and made by Jennifer Sampou, quilted by Angela Walters
    Stacked Blankets, designed and made by Valori Wells
    Think Big, designed and made by Jacquie Gehring, quilted by Angela Walters
    Think Big, designed and made by Jacquie Gehring, quilted by Angela Walters
    Sanibel designed and made by Weeks Ringle and Bill Kerr
    Modern Cross, designed and made by Kathy Mack
    Centered, designed and made by Cherri House, quilted by Angela Walters
    Color Frames, designed and made by Amy Ellis, quilted by Natalia Bonner
    Ladders, designed and made by Elizabeth Hartman
    Keys, designed and made by Alissa Haight Carlton

  5. Wow, so many gorgeous works of art. It was hard to choose my favorites, but I had to make mention of One Fine Day with its millions of little pieces that result in painting-like shading. Incredible. Of that series of modern quilts, I’m quite taken by that second one, the circle on top of the stripes with the circular quilting pattern.

  6. Elizabeth, thank you so, so much for sharing these photos – they are all stunning! And having just discovered Freddy Moran (and bought 3 books by her /Gwen Marston), it was extra special to see that FM-inspired quilt.

  7. Oh cool! I stumbled upon your blog today and saw the posts from Road2Ca, and you took a couple of great pictures of my LOUD quilt! It really was loud, it kept telling me what it wanted to be and I couldn’t ignore that voice!

  8. I found your blog today and was thrilled to see that you enjoyed my quilt, Bubble-Licious at Road2California. I had great fun designing and quilting her.

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