My Small World, June 2015 edition

Small WorldMagScreenShot

I don’t often jump on the Latest and Greatest Thing in QuiltLand, but this one called my name.  It’s Jen Kingwell’s My Small World and was printed in the oh-so-elusive QuiltMania Spring issue 2015 (picture above is from the QuiltMania website).  I don’t know why you are making it (there is a My Small World QAL on Instagram and other places), but I know why I am making it.

1966brochure_smallworld

It’s because in the 1960s, when wearing white socks with your loafers was considered cool and women always wore pantyhose with their bare legs, I came here.  Our family was on our way home from living for two years in Lima, Peru. It was in the days of Disneyland with tickets, and we seemed to have enough for our family of seven children to go on this ride.  Since I had a broken leg, I went on it more than once.

The ride, first fabricated for the 1964 New York World’s Fair, was installed in California’s Disneyworld in 1966, which will make it fifty years old next year.  I live about an hour from the original Disneyland, so it’s my patriotic duty to honor this institution, right?  Of course we all know THAT song:

“Children of the World” was the working title of the attraction. Its tentative soundtrack, which can be heard on the album, featured the national anthems of each country represented throughout the ride all playing all at once, which resulted in disharmonic cacophony. Walt conducted a walk through of the attraction scale model with his staff songwriters Robert B. Sherman and Richard M. Sherman, saying, “I need one song that can be easily translated into many languages and be played as a round.” The Sherman Brothers then wrote “It’s a Small World (after all)” in the wake of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, which influenced the song’s message of peace and brotherhood. When they first presented it to Walt, they played it as a slow ballad. Walt requested something more cheerful, so they sped up the tempo and sang in counterpoint. Walt was so delighted with the final result that he renamed the attraction “It’s a Small World” after the Sherman Brothers’ song.” (Wikipedia)

Small-World-Tokyo-Strip-1

While I have no idea if Jen Kingwell was influenced by the smart geometrics, towers and shapes (Tokyo Disney, above), to me there is a clear connection.

MySmallWorld_1Judging by the photos on Instagram, we all start here: cutting sky pieces.  I did neutrals for a while, then started adding in whispy blues, just to make it more interesting, as I’d seen others do it.  It’s that idea of collaboration, as expressed in my last blog post.
MySmallWorld_2

Section One’s Sky.  I was listening to a book on Audible, that I finally had to turn up to 2x speed just to get through it.  I’m not recommending it.

Beautiful Mystery Gamache

Now I’m back to Inspector Gamache, written by Louise Penny.  I’m going to hate it when I get through reading this series!

MySmallWorld_3

Buildings and some sky.  Now to start on the details.  I found reading Susan’s entries on her PatchworknPlay blog was helpful, too.

MySmallWorld_4

I used some leftover leaves from the Pineapples and Crowns quilt to make this square.

MySmallWorld v1 detaila

Susan’s idea to start the tiny pinwheels by cutting two inch squares, then making HSTs, then on to the pinwheel was a good idea.  I threw in some of my New York City fabric, with the words Radio City Hall to liven up this section.

It took me forever to figure out what text thing to put at the top of the building, but I went for this one, since Betsy is a childhood name.  I also had fun fussy cutting a hot air balloon in the Sky Section for Section 2.  You can see the bits of blue sky in the neutrals now.  Here is the progress I’ve made so far:

MySmallWorld1and2Churn Dash Diagram 12And here’s my contribution to the Errata: In section 2, the center square for the churn dash is incorrect.  It should measure 1 1/2″ no 2 1/2″.  Having said that, I have enormous appreciation to Jen Kingwell for this pattern–it has a LOT of moving parts and to even get some sort of pattern down on paper is amazing.

In my real small world, I’ve taken a couple of trips since the semester finished.

David Graduation

The first one was to Phoenix to see my daughter’s husband graduate from Dental School.  I think he had the oldest children of any of his fellow graduates there!  They have happily moved to their new city, and he has started work already.  But this week, they are on a trip to Disneyland to celebrate their achievement.

scan machines

And to start the summer off with a bang, I also took a couple of trips through these two machines as a spot on my lungs showed up in my yearly X-ray.  It is because of *this* that my oncologist checks everything.  Twice.  The diagnosis from these humming machines revealed it was nothing to worry about, although for three weeks I did — a lot. I couldn’t really talk about it at the time, so I’m glad it’s behind me.

Basket Blocks Quilt Top

However going through all that certainly made me feel like a basket case.  No, I didn’t know about this when I started this quilt, but it certainly is appropriate!  Now I should really get to the closets that need cleaning out, the papers that needs tossing.  It’s nice to think about regular life again.

I’ve also been busy sewing up more Circles Blocks as I want to finish that quilt and get it quilted.  I have one more to go, then I’ll have sixteen total.  Block #13 will be up on the blog in a couple of weeks.  Here they are stacked together:

Circles Blocks StacksWhat’s been going on in Your Small World?

Circles EPP Button

Next block is coming on July 1st!

New Hexagon Millefiore Quilt Along

That title is a mouthful.  Did I get it all?

New Hexagon Book

Katja Marek, who wrote this book, is hosting Mother Hen to all of us as we work our way towards having a new version of a millefiore quilt, based on the blocks in her book.  Laurel and Rhonda and Cindy and about 1500 of my other closest friends are doing this.  It’s fun to see the rosettes pop up on Instagram and in my Google Images when I search for them for inspiration.

Millefiore Quilt Alonginspiration

I’d pulled these pages of a Morocan town out of the travel magazine, with all their aquas and moody blues, yellow-greens and dark blues as inspiration, then pulled a bunch of fabrics.

Basket of fabrics

For a long time they were pinned into my design wall, but then I needed the wall, so they now live in this basket.

Millefiore Quilt Along1

The very middle six triangles are the center, and here you see round one, of Rosette One.

Millefiore Quilt Along1a

Katja sends us an email every month, telling us about the next rosette.  I act like we’ve done this for years, but really we all started in January.  Well, people who weren’t trying to get a college English class up and going started January first, but the others of us began like, last week or so.  Here I’m plotting Round Two.

Millefiore Quilt Along2

Still plotting.  I ordered the templates from Paper Pieces, as suggested, mainly because my brain just couldn’t handle one more decision.  A good choice for me, but I know others are tracing them off.  Definitely do the glue stick thing when you attach your fabric to the paper pieces.  It’s brilliant.

Millefiore Rosette2

Tonight, as I watched The Muppet Movie (the most recent one with Tina Fey, who made me laugh), I finished off the third round of Rosette One.  I have one more round to go.  This thing is getting really big, so I decided to pop out the interior papers.

sliding out papers

I loosen the edges by sliding underneath them with my stiletto, and they pop right out.

Rosette Closeup2

Fun to be at this point.  Tomorrow, after I grade six more essays (I had a batch come in on Wednesday and I’m doing six-a-day until they are done), I’ll pull all those fabrics out of my basket and make a bigger mess in here (see photos below).

Goals 1stQtr2015

I also wrote up my goals for the quarter, conveniently skipping January because we all know what that month was like.  I can already see some holes in the quarter, like where are the Circle Blocks?  One a month?

Papers on ironing board

My horoscope, which I read faithfully and believe about 10% of the time, said I was spending too much time on things that would not matter in the long run.  This is one of those 10% times it actually coincided with what was going on in my real life.  Like lining up the readings for the next unit on the ironing board.  I sent eight more readings off to the printers today.  I have to get this unit ready because I’m headed to QuiltCon in about (wait, let me get my phone out of my pocket because QuiltCon has its own app that tells me how many days. . .)

QuiltCon App

Okay, this was a couple of days ago, but you get my drift.  They have thought of everything to make us freaked out, excited quilters.  It’s like it’s more than a Quilt Show…it’s a Life Changing Event.  I think of it as a way to party with quilters, and certainly these young’uns will be a different bunch than the usual staid quilters.  I knew this because one of the items in their scavenger hunt is to find someone whose tattoo I love.  Right.

Messy RoomOkay, so between the prepping, grading, planning and working on everything else, here is a Truthy Moment: the mess at my sewing desk.  I expect it will be clean, say, about July.

4-in-art_3button

I loved reading all your comments about our recent Four-in-Art quilts, and am slowly working my way through them.  Somehow the internet swallowed a few comments, so I have to go and find them.  I can see them on the website, but not in my email, where I usually answer them.  Thank you all for the lovely things you wrote.  I think we were energized by new members, the new yearly theme and the added bonus of choosing our own quarterly theme.  Now you know why I ordered my papers for my hexagon.  Way too many decisions!

Magnolias

P.S.  I think Spring is trying to happen out here!

Elizabeth’s Lollypop Trees, final

Lollypop Trees Quilt_final Front

Elizabeth’s Lollypop Trees
began May 2011 • finished April 2014

Lollypop Trees Quilt_final BackA Kaffee Fassett Lotus Blossom print for the back, and I am finally done.  I know you’ve seen an overabundance of photos of this quilt, so this is just a simple, abbreviated post to say I’m finished.  (Or should I say: I’m FINISHED!!!)

Lollypop All Quilted

Lollypop Tree 1Some time ago, my granddaughter Keagan saw my blocks up on my design wall, and quietly made a picture for me of what she saw. (I think it’s the block in the lower righthand corner of the quilt.)  I love it, so I put it on the label.

Lollypop Trees Quilt_labelQuilt #132 on my 200 Quilts list
73″ square

˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚˚
This blog software has an excellent search engine box.  If you want to see details about this quilt, type “Lollypop Trees” in the search box to the right, and you’ll get more posts than you know what to do with.  If you have specific questions, feel free to leave a comment and I’ll get back to you.  Thank you to all who cheered me on and kept me going, in spite of days of wondering if I’d ever finish.  It’s very satisfying to see that quilt, to run my fingers over the quilting, and to know that I did it.

That’s three finishes in two weeks.  Now to grade research papers until my brains fall out and my fingers fall off.

Counting Down

 But look!  Only four more days of teaching in this semester!

Road to California 2014, part II

There was a great exhibit of quilts from the book I was lucky enough to be in: Amish Quilts, The Adventure Continues.  As always, seeing them in person, beats a flat picture or a digital photograph any day. (How has that changed what we esteem as “good” quilts?  Just something to think about.)  That’s why quilt shows are so valuable as they allow a viewer to fall in love with quilts again.

LucyOceanWaves

Suzanne Keeney Lucy’s Ocean Waves

WeberHipToBeSquare_1

Two views of Michelle Webber’s It’s Hip to Be Square

WeberHipToBeSquare_2

YostenBonner_2

Two views (one to show the quilting) of Reflection of the Times, made by Angela Yosten and quilted by Natalia Bonner

YostenBonner

Likewise there were some quilts from QuiltCon.

FriedlanderLocalQuilt

I took a shot of this one because I love Carolyn Friedlander’s fabrics, but it is true that this quilt is lacking some contrast.  It’s not just the photography.  The title of this one is The Local Quilt.

GeringDeconNinePatch

Deconstructed Nine Patch by Jacquie Gering

HartmanHoneyInSpace

Honey in Space, by Elizabeth Hartman

HarvatineLogPyramids

Log Pyramids, by Liz Harvatine

HeitlandYouRule

You Rule, by Brigitte Heitland

HutchinsonLongConversation

and lastly, A Very Long Conversation, by Rossie Hutchinson.  I was pretty sure I had a photo from Christa Watson’s String of Pearls (using Lizzy House’s fabric–a great design) but it’s too blurry to post, so go *here* to see that fun quilt. . . and her (more on that later).  There were a couple of quilts I was sure I had a photo of, but when I looked at them, I must have been taking them on a fast run past.  Maybe it was because I had too many bags around my shoulders?

charm display quilt

At this point, don’t you think we need a little retail therapy?  This is the little quilt in the charm booth–a way to display those little pins we all love.  This group had figured out how to make earrings out of them, so they had a lot of people crowded around.

Fabricworm Booth

Fabricworm’s first time at Road.  Judging from the crowd at their booth, I think they’ll be back.

floor mat and chair

Loved the chair AND the floor mat.  The floor “rug” looked like just patches with some sort of matte finish brushed over it.

Quilters Who Lunch_Friday

And LUNCH!  From left, Leisa, Lisa, Lisa’s sister-in-law Betty (who came from another state just for Road), me and Simone.  Get your scrolling fingers ready, here come more quilts!

HirthLooseLeafEarl Grey

Janet Dorsey Hirth used lots of different piecing styles in her sampler quilt, titled Loose Leaf Earl Grey.

FMQingRoad

Random snapshot of free-motion quilting

FeitelsonMusicofSpheres

This is a terrible picture of a fabulous quilt, by Ann Feitelson, titled Music of the Spheres.  Google it and you should find a better photo.  It’s really amazing.

FeitelsonBasketWeave

Here’s another Ann Feitelson.  I think she never sleeps.  This one is titled Basket Weave II: See Saw.  There was a lot of math that went into this quilt, judging from her description.  She writes “The titled also refers to seeing and have seen, the way vision shifts in every blink.”

FeitelsonBasketWeave_2

BrunyBlastPast_1

Kim Bruny’s Blast from the Past is so named because all the bright designs and paisley prints remind her of her childhood.  Well, now we know how old she is!  (Kidding, Kim.  It was a terrific quilt.) I have several photos, showing details.

BrunyBlastPast_detail

detail

She used the “tiling” method of creating her top: appliquéing her patches to a single piece of fabric, keeping the pieces an even distance away, so it looks like tiles have been laid down.

BrunyBlastPast_detail2

And in the borders–broderie perse, a technique of using specific cuts of the printed fabric to create the design.

BrunyBlastPast_detail3

I liked this quilting because it wasn’t so dense.  Lately quilters have been quilting their quilts so densely, they could stand up as a room screen by themselves.  This is a nice change.

DelmanMarksburyKartwheels

Sandi Delman’s Kartwheels was started in 2009, and took several raids of her fabric stash to make the rings, arcs, borders and stars.  Kerry Marksbury quilted it.

BirchTequilaSunrise

Eva Birch’s Tequila Sunrise was a more modern quilt with lots of interesting quilting in the negatives spaces.  Even though the photo above looks washed out, the background fabric was deep-toned. Two more detail shots:

BirchTequilaSunrise_3

BirchTequilaSunrise_2

Nancy Rink and I

I spent the better part of Friday afternoon tearing back and forth between the Superior Thread Booth and the booth where my quilter Cathy Kreter was working, talking about threads, designs, colors, etc.  I was successful in choosing a thread, and on the way back, I stopped by Nancy Rink’s booth to show her my quilt (she designed this quilt).  She obliged me with a photo.  Yes, I carried that king-sized quilt top around all afternoon (which may account for some of the blurry photos).

Leisa and I

After a long day (as both Leisa and I woke up too early that morning and couldn’t go back to sleep) my little gang, The Good Heart Quilters, took ourselves to the local El Torito, where ten of us gathered round the table, including Cindy of Live A Colorful Life and Deborah of Simply Miss Luella. (They’ve adopted us Good Heart Quilters.)

Gang Out for Dinner

A few went back home to our town, and those of us who were staying the night gathered together in mine and Leisa’s room, did Show and Tell and talked shop.  I’m not letting those others go home next year, and think we ought to order in some chocolate cake and ice cream for fun.

Hotel View

You’ll hear us Southern Californians complain about our drought (those mountains ought to have WHITE tops, not brown), but you can’t beat waking up to this on a January morning.  We’re in for a doozy this summer in terms of water rationing.  Expect me to come and see you for a shower this summer.  Okay, last batch of quilts.  Here we go.

AdairGiddiness_1

Pat Adair’s Joyful Giddiness used a few of Kim McClean’s patterns to create the appliqué in this quilt.

AdairGiddiness_2

A lovely quilt, as evidenced by the use of color, piecing and quilting (and that blue ribbon!).

AllenAlmostSymmetry_1

Almost Symmetry, by Nicki Allen (quilted by Kathy Gray).

AllenAlmostSymmetry_2

This was made for the EZ Dresden Quilt Challenge, an online challenge sponsored by the Salt Lake Modern Quilt Guild.

BelfordAndromeda

Marilyn Belford used all varieties of fabrics and techniques to create this masterpiece titled Perseus Saving Andromeda.

Belford_detail

That rough water is raw-edge appliquéd, as is most of the quilt.

BergmanFracturedStar

Fractured Star was made by Linda Bergmann and quilted by Debbie Lopez, and is a Karen Stone design.

BianchiGraffitiHeart

So is Susan Bianchi’s Graffiti Heart a quilt? Since she created her design out of beads and buttons on whole cloth?  I remember that controversy came up with Hollis Chatelein first debuted at Houston, with her whole-cloth painted quilts.  (She earned a blue ribbon that year.)  Whatever, this was one of two of these button/bead quilts in the show, fascinating collages utilizing hard surface design.

And now it’s time for the Ugly Quilt Award.  Every year I try to pick the ugliest quilt.  It could miss on overall composition, surface design treatment, overreaching in the skill department (think: Peter Principle), or by the fact that somehow, it was just plain.  And ugly.  A very subjective category, but in walking around with some of my quilter friends, a number of them pointed out candidates for this award, so I know it wasn’t just me.  All of these are nameless, maker-less.  And in full-disclosure, any one of us could in any given year qualify, so no hubris intended.

Ugly Quilt_7

From the plastic doll, to the overly busy background to the tassels, andthat 3D hair, this is a sure qualifier.

Ugly Quilt_6

Another angel candidate, with her strangely proportioned torso to that gift-wrapped bow on the corner.  Hmmm.

Ugly Quilt_2

Meant to evoke a haunting response from the viewer, of the souls of lost native Americans now inhabiting the abandoned-dwellings-now-a-National-Park (I suppose) instead this just came off as creepy-looking, kind of like a cartoonish dead baby head filling a sacred space.

Ugly Quilt_1

Update: While I originally noted the fine quality of the quilting and the good design and composition of space, I panned this quilt for the drawings, as they looked extremely juvenile.  My sister, the historian, called me tonight to tell me that she thinks they were based on well-known (to historians) primitive drawings done by Native Americans at some of the critical battles.  She’ll let me know the source, and then I’ll add it here.

Ugly Quilt_1 detail2

Ugly Quilt_1 detail

If it is true that this quilt was based on those historical drawings, it obviously needs to be moved from this category.  (However, I still stand on the unfortunate quilted swirls on the men’s faces.)

Okay, Ugly Quilt Contest over.  Later on I’ll show you my favorite quilt, and I’ll tell you why.  (The ones I love usually never win at this show.  But I was happy to see this week that one of my favorites from last year went on to Win Big at other national contests.)  Okay, back to the quilts.

ThompsonModernAlphabet

Modern Alphabet, made and quilted by Gerrie Thompson.

ThompsonModernAlpha1

Yep, I’m pretty much fixated on DSM quilting this year.  My apologies.

WolfeKABOOM

Patricia Wolfe titled her innovation of a traditional Bear Paw block KABOOM! Bear Paws Gone Wild.  She also quilted it herself.

WilsonMischiefMaker

Titled Mishief Maker, Sue Wilson both made and quilted this octopus quilt, hand-painting the design on linen.  I walked around with my friend Simone and she gave me a lesson on borders, and why are quilters so attached to their borders?  As a trained graphic artist, she showed me several quilts that would have benefitted from “breaking the borders,” as the traditional use of that space enclosing a design cramped the artistry of the quilt.  This was a successful breaking of the border, she noted.  We both loved it.

QuiltersWhoLunch_day2LUNCH! (Day Two) with Cindy, Deborah, me, Leisa and Christa of ChristaQuilts.  It was a great conversation about quilting, the industry, design, breaking news and old news, one of the advantages of getting together at a quilt show.

Okay, last gasp of quilts, then my favorite.

UptonOdinTrilogy3

One of a trio of quilts, Linzi Upton’s quilts were tucked away at the back of the hall.  Another quilt, Silver Madonna won big last year, and these look like they follow in the same trend of using metallic fabric, then painting it, then quilting it to achieve the texture.

UptonOdinTrilogy2

The title of the three together is Odin’s Triology, and Upton made and quilted them all.

UptonOdinTrilogy

TaylorLonelyCrowdedRm

Another strong black and white quilt, ChrisTaylor’s I have felt lonely in a crowded room brought in architectural features of doors, windows and line to portray that feeling of being “alone” yet feeling “comforted by memories.”

TarrSnapshots

Inspired by the Holyoke Range and the Connecticut rivers near her home, Timna Tarr created Valley Snapshots, a rich mix of shape and color.  This was almost my most favorite.

TarrRequestDedication

Timna Tarr was busy this year, getting two quilts into Road.  This one, titled Request and Dedication, started out as a Wheel of Fortune block, but “after ten years of marriage [to a musician], he finally rubbed off on me and I unintentionally made a record quilt.”

TarrRequestDedication_3

I had to show you close-ups of the quilting.

TarrRequestDedication_2

SchlotzhauerSpillingOver

Spilling Over was made and quilted by Sharon Schlotzhauer, her inspiration coming from the loss of a treasured quilt, and from the “faith. . . [and] loving thoughts and prayers from friends and the quilting community.”

OKellyCitrusSlices

Citrus Slices by Marie O’Kelley was dear to my heart, as we live near the Citrus Experimental Station of the University of California–Riverside.  She writes “This quilt commemorates my brother’s career at UCR hybridizing new citrus varieties.  Included are the names of his hybrids and those of more common citrus types.”  By the way, if you like the little easy-to-peel Cutie (brand) tangerines, you have the scientists at UCR to thank.

MoonAutumnWhirlpool

Autumn Whirlpool, by Bobbie Moon.

MurphyBanderitas

Banderitas, by Victoria Murphy

MyersDaisyDance

Daisy Dance, by Susan Meyers, from a pattern by Kathy Munkelwitz

TaylorWashBeak_front

And now my favorite quilt of the show.  It’s not flashy, overly huge, stylized with 300 pounds of crystals and bling, but it’s a perfectly executed gem of a quilt.  Titled, Did You Wash Your Beak, it comes from a nature photograph of Eastern Bluebirds by Steve Byland.

TaylorWashBeak_quilting

The quilting appeared to be in a heavier weight variegated thread, which shows every flaw.  I couldn’t find any.  Taylor had put more leaves in the background of his quilting, surrounding those with small stippling stitches.  The branch had more texture added by the quilting.

TaylorWashBeak_back

The white-gloved lady held it up to show me the back.  Exquisite.  Taylor writes “I believe this is my most accomplished quilt to date.  The technique I have been trying to master for the past 12 years. . . was to create an appliquéd quilt that appears to be a photograph or painting at first glance.”  I’d say he succeeded.

TaylorWashBeak_detail

All of these feathers, the claw, all pieces really, are needle-turned appliqué, with the quilting enhancing the shading and structure. A masterpiece of a quilt.  While some might aspire to be the big old blue ribbon winner at the front of the hall, by the CD-selling harpist, I aspire to create quiet quilts of detail and story like this one.  I loved it!

Road to California Logo

And that’s all folks–see you next year!!

From Baskets to a Museum–more quilts in Utah

Nat'lHistoryMuseum
While visiting relatives in Utah, just before I tucked into the new semester of teaching (which would explain why I have been AWOL for a couple of weeks), my husband and I headed to Salt Lake City’s newest museum: The Natural History Museum, high up above the University of Utah.  It is a gorgeous museum, complete with artifacts, history and dinosaur bones.

Nati'l History Museum Baskets

But I was more interested in the woven baskets in the Native People’s exhibit.  I guess I’m fascinated by color and pattern, in all forms.

Lino Quilt

Which is why I found this piece of art, in the Millcreek Library so fascinating.  That library, where my sister-in-law Annie works, has a Senior Citizen’s center, a gym, a cafeteria and of course, art.

Lino Quilt detail

This appears to make of some sort of plasticized material–almost like a thin linoleum, cut and sewn in quilt patterns.  I loved it.

Polaroid CameraQuilt

I had brought up my Polaroid Quilt to show my mother, and my dad held up his finger as if to signal a pause and came back carrying this: a genuine, bonafide Polaroid camera.  Of course, there’s not any film to be found for it anymore, but I thought it deserved a picture with the quilt.

Springville_Toone

On the way home, we headed to the Springville Art Museum, which hosts a quilt show every August.  I snapped a lot of photos, but here are just some of them.  This one is titled Juxtaposition and is by Marilyn Landry Toone, and was inspired by her daughter’s choice of fabrics from her “fabric stash of 40-plus years.”

Springville_Thompson

I’ve Had the Blues is made by Jacque Thompson and quilted by Kim Peterson, and was made “entirely out of scraps using one-inch strips.”

Springville_Thompson detail

Detail of the beautiful quilting.

Springville_Roylance

Kristen Roylance’s quilt Posy Patch was made using a modified disappearing 4-patch block, and was quilted by Molly Kohler.  The dimensional flowers were charming.

Springville_Roylance detail

Springville_quilt detail

I snapped this one without noting who made or quilted it–it’s really beautiful and detailed.

Springville_Olsen

“Look, honey,” I said to my husband.  “A Dear Jane quilt!”  “Dear what?” he said.  The title of this one is Dear Jane Invites Hannah for a Dutch Treat, and is made and quilted by Shirley Olsen.  It was a masterpiece and earned an Award of Excellance from the judges.

Springville_McClellan

Marion McClellan’s Bottle Cap Bangles is a fun use of hexagrams and fussy-cut fabric.  She also quilted her piece.

Springville_Jacobs

This quilt, Zinnia Basket, was made and quilted by Patti Jacobs, from a Kim Diehl pattern.  Apparently she used to think that quilters were nuts to “spend time doing hand appliqué when you could sew the pieces on with the sewing machine,” but now is a dedicated lover of appliqué.

Springville_Jacobs detail

I really liked the border.

Springville_Evans

Kaye Evans quilt, Just One Weed, is named for the dandelion hexagon in the middle of the quilt.  It was quilted by Sue McCarty.

Springville_display

The quilt display was merged with a display of giant critters made out of auto body parts, springs, doodads and whatevers.

Camera Bug

I liked Tim Little’s Camera Bug the best.

Springville_Dave

My husband knows just what to do at a quilt show: become like a camera bug and start taking photos.  Many of these photos are his–he’s a delight, but was probably relieved that there was no vendor mall here.

Springville_Crawford

Ladies of the Sea was made by Karin Lee Crawford and quilted by Judy Madsen.  It was a pattern from Sue Garmen depicting famous rigged sailing vessels from around the world.

Springville_Crawford detail

Detail.  I have to assume that the quilter is really Judi Madsen, of Green Fairy fame, but I could be wrong.  It was gorgeous in both the making and the quilting.

Springville_Christensen

And to finish up this little quilt show, a Log Cabin quilt.  Megan Christensen made the quilt, but didn’t identify the quilter.  The title is A Good Use of Scraps, inspiring us all to get going on our scrap baskets!

Springville_Christensen detail