Delectable Baskets: Quilt Finish

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Delectable Baskets • Quilt #220
Approximately 70″ wide by 90″ high

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Delectable Baskets gets its name because each basket is filled with food — well — food fabrics. I’d been collecting for over twenty years, so I had a few to choose from.  In February 2018 I was Queen Bee for the Gridsters, and put up a post about making basket blocks, deciding that I wanted to use my collection of fabrics with food motifs.  I sent each of my beemates a couple of squares. (There is a free basket tutorial on that post, if you are interested in making some baskets.)

Baskets of Food quilt top

Not only did my Gridster Beemates send me blocks, but a few other long-time friends sent them also; I had so many blocks that my quilt grew and grew, and then it was overflowing, a lovely dilemma to have.  So I pruned it a bit, as I was aiming for twin-size, and still have enough baskets for an upcoming wall-hanging.

Cathy of CJ Designs did an expanded Baptist Fan on it, leaving it nice and soft, which is a good thing, as I intend it for use in the guest bedroom, which is currently the quilting-and-thread-storage bedroom.  I promise that maybe I can share.

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The back, using some Phillip Jacobs (on the right) and some Marimekko (from Crate and Barrel’s outlet sale some years ago).  The signature blocks (the white Xs) are pieced into the Phillip Jacobs, or at least I think that’s who designed that fabric.  At any rate, the print is a lovely-as-can-be radishes.Food Basket Quilt_5

Thank you to everyone who sent me blocks.  Delectable Baskets has been on my radar for  a couple of decades or more, beginning with visits to Fabric Patch quilt shop, the vendor mall in the early years of Road to California, a couple of Southern California Shop Hops, and an occasional trip to Utah.  There were no mail-order shops then, as there was no internet then.  We bought fabric from JoAnns which it wasn’t then (maybe Cloth World?).  I accrued fabrics a yard at a time, a piece at a time, a slow compilation.

This quilt was finished in an era where everything is on hyperdrive.  The internet runs, assists and invades our lives, helping and hindering us in our quilting.  Sometimes we are in a quilt bubble, making the same quilt (see my Flag Quilt from last post), using the same colors, same fabric lines.  Other times it brings us news of friends in Australia, in Japan, Canada, Germany and certainly from around the United States, and allows us to meet and be friends with people all over the world.

Our gathering of Gridsters would not be possible without the internet, and all members, past or present, contribute to my life is a positive and beneficial way.

I am happy to know you all, Gridster Bee member or not.  Thank you for enriching my life, making it a veritable feast.  I dedicate Delectable Baskets to you.

Final Finishes for 2015

Thank you for all your kind comments on IG and on the last post.  A lot of this post was mostly written before the San Bernardino tragedy, so it may seem lighthearted. But it still is Christmas and I still delight in making, in fact it is a great leveler in crazy times.  Enjoy the quilting.

Rosette #5

Rosette #5 is finished, so now I can start to plan #6.  I loved the fabrics that fell into place on this one.Chuck Nohara11_15 blocks

Here’s November’s Chuck Nohara blocks.  These all measure 6″ finished, so they are like eating small bites of chocolate.  I even got the “hollow” on the cherries embroidered since last time.  The blocks on the second row on either end, are using fabrics from A Quilting Life’s Bright Sun line of fabrics, and the center one uses fabrics from their Valley collection.

Bright Sun FabricsBright Sun is above. I like how different they are, yet they all coordinate.  (Yes, Sherri is a friend, and yes, I bought these from Fat Quarter Shop.)

Here are some of the steps I took for two of the blocks:

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I started here, tracing the outline of the handle with a chalk pencil.  I then clipped the edges, and finger pressed it, rolling the chalked line to the underneath as I went (a trick from Becky Goldsmith of Piece O Cake).  I centered it on the upper piece, but just pinned it.  As I stitched (later on) I also ended up trimming down the seam allowance to a scant 1/4″–here it is a fat 1/4.”

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I figured out where I wanted the flowers on the upper basket rim, then ironed down my freezer paper (I traced it from the book’s enlarged picture) and traced around it.CN904_6 CN904_6a

I traced the lower basket and side edges, labeled them, then clipped them apart so I could fussy cut the arrows from the fabric.  I stitched it all together, and added the lower edge.
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I gauged where the handle would fall in relation to the basket using a ruler, then appliquéd it down. CN904_4

I double-checked it again.  At six inches, there’s not a lot of leeway for mistakes, yet the blocks do sew up quickly.

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I pinned the basket bottom to the top piece and hand-appliqued it down.

CN904_5ajpgI trimmed the upper piece after sewing it.

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Next.  Start here.  Seam together the flowery petal pieces, then lay them over the corner wedge. CN432_3

I began appliquéing from the center, out to each side.  Trust me on this.

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Seam together two, then four.  Then sew together each side.

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The dots save you from agonizing over that center join, and are kind of fun.

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Here’s what we have put up for December.  Even though we have listed four blocks, you only have to do two to feel good about yourself, especially in the month of December.

2015 December Chuck Nohara

2015 December MCM_ERichards

Lastly, my last bee blocks for Mid-Century Modern are finished. More info can be found on our blog.

Holly

Keep sewing, my friends.  Stay safe.  Celebrate regular days and regular life, and really celebrate Christmas this year, both in word and in deed.