European Patchwork Meeting • Final Post

This has a billion pictures, so get ready to scroll.  I need to wrap this up and bring my head back to what I’m doing in real life.  This is the final post of my visit to the European Patchwork Meeting in the Alsace region of France, this past September.  I have a main page that lists all the posts, in case you come at this from a side street on the web.

This quilt show, or meeting, was held in four different towns in France, and I’ll wrap up the first town, Sainte Marie Aux Mines, then move to St. Croix Aux Mines, and finally Liepvre.  We didn’t make it to the last town, Rombach le Franc, but Jodie Zolliger, who lives in Europe, has written several great posts about what she saw, including the Amish exhibit.  If you are interested, feel free to click over to her blog to catch more.

The Amish exhibit was beautifully laid out in this venue, and as I mentioned, Jodie wrote a great post about it, with better titles and information than I gathered.


We walked down to the Temple Reforme, where the Val Patch Association, the local guild, had an exhibit titled “La Maison,” or Home.  All of the quilts in that exhibit centered around the theme of home, showing slices of daily life.


I took a panoramic of the colorful quilts across one side of the church. EPM_Guild3EPM_Guild2

But fell in love with these panels, made by several members.  Jodie has a great post on this one, too.


Off we go to the next town.


Pilot, 1995 • 100cm x 126 cm

I selected to head to the Espace Expositions first, to see the Beauville Company’s exhibition of prints from their archives, but was entranced by the skilled and exquisite use of log cabin construction by Andrew Leblanc in her quilts.   I am listing the sizes of the quilts in centimeters, as noted on their title signs.  (100 centimeters is roughly equal to 39 inches.)


Pilot, detail

It was pretty amazing to me how she’s used the width of the strips to create her portraits and pictures.  Again, the lighting was superb.


Professor, 1996 • 76 cm x 100 cm

I laughed at this one, because my husband is a professor (but he doesn’t look like someone out of 10th century Russia, or what I thought this man looked like).  Detail of the glasses, below.



Oasis, 2011 • 103 cm x 103 cm

While this isn’t a figurative portrait, the use of these fabrics was so interesting–not ones you’d associate with creating a design of any kind.  Detail, below.



Colin-Maillard, 1995 • 110 cm x 220 cm


Colin-Maillard, detail showing fabrics


I like how they’d put other constructions of hers in a tableau on the floor.  She had many quilts there.





She was always busy talking to people at her table, so I could only get this sideways shot of her.  Her website shows many different parts of her creativity.


We headed down the road, again, to Liepvre (and try as I might, I cannot get my blogging program to allow the accents over their words, so I apologize–it keeps kicking them out when it spellchecks), to the Eglise de l’Assomption where an exhibit of Hildegard Muller (Germany) was hung.  The lighting was very “contrasty” so I did a little photoshopping on these to render them closer to what I saw.


At the birch grove, 2016 • 102 cm x 70 cm


Detail.  She hand-dyed her fabrics and then let her mind find the scene that was in the cloth, or so she told me later, when I asked.  However, other times, she had an idea in mind when she was dying the cloth, and made it that way.


Love in wartimes, 2015 • 102 cm x 70 cm




Dreams of Amsterdam, 2014 • 102 cm x 70 cm


Dreams of Amsterdam, detail.




We walked from their to the Exhibition Hall to catch a couple of exhibits; we had to choose as we didn’t have time to see them all. So many of the quilts in this building were perfectly done, all Best-of-Show-type quilts.  The one above took my breath away, so I have a few details shots of it.  I loved that it was an imitation of one in the Shelbourne Museum — another way our patchwork influence crosses the ocean.  The title of the quilt was Marie-Henriette, and was made by Martine Crabe-Lanux.


The Twinkle-Stars Remake Quilt by Helga Huisman Hildebrand was also in the “France Patchwork” association section.  There were several countries represented in this hall.


Another France Patchwork quilt, titled Bleus, and made by Maria Vuilleumier.


She also had one done in gray, black and white strips, but that one was called Insomnie, or Insomnia.  (Because I’m trying to wrap this up, I’ve heavily edited what I’m posting.)


Last section, last group of quilts is from the Patchwork Gilde of Germany.  These quilts blew me away.  Every year they have an exhibition and members are asked to enter what they’ve been working on (more info on the placard, below).  This grouping was titled “From Tradition to Modernity 21.”  Because your scrolling fingers are probably worn out at this point, I’ll post the title and the maker on the quilt; some titles are in German.



Komposition, by Christa Ebert • 110 x 142 cm


Detail, Komposition


Frau Hansen Klaverquilt, by Uta Rodemerk • 183 cm square


Mannerschmuck in Frauenhand, by Sabine Koch


Mannerschmuck in Frauenhand, detail

Okay, as near as Google could translate it, I think this means “Men’s Jewelry in Women’s Hand,” which I thought was really clever given that these are neckties.


Ausrangiert-neu sortiert, by Inge Bohl of Germany

Discarded, rearranged is how Google Translate interprets this title.


Zerbrochene Illusionen, by Lilo Hartmann

Zerbrochene Illusionen means Broken Illusions, as translated by Google Translate.


Zerbrochene Illusionen, detail


The Power of Blue, by Gabriele Schultz-Herzberger • 75 x 132 cm


Flussaufwarts, by Susanne Fellmann-Horsch


Flussaufwarts, detail


Crazy Canadian Square Dance, by Barber Reschka • 108 x 107 cm


Schattenspiel, by Monika Flake • 107 x 131 cm


Schattenspiel, detail.


In GrossmuttersNahkastchen gekramt, by Christine Naumann • 78 x 86 cm


In GrossmuttersNahkastchen gekramt, detail.


So what do you do about it? by Maire-Christine Chammas • 108 x 147 cm

Very cool quilting.


Vogelwild III, by Tina Mast • 129 cm x 94 cm

I was told that she teaches art at the local university.  This was stunning.


Leaves, by Christine Brandstetter • 99 x 132 cm

I talked for a few short minutes to the Uta Lenk, who was the International Representative of the German Patchwork Guild, and she said they would welcome the chance to exhibit at American shows.  I know our local show, Road to California, often has exhibits come from other places, and I would love to see these there.  I almost joined the German guild, but realized that all their materials would be in German, and alas, I wouldn’t be able to read them, but I did buy a pin.

All in all, going to the European Patchwork Meeting taught me that while we Americans fanned the flames of patchwork, the idea of three layers held together somehow, has taken wings, and taken off.  If I were to go again, I’d leave at least two days for the show, and perhaps stay somewhere closer (we stayed the first night in Mulhouse, about an hour away) and in Turckheim the second night (35 minutes away).  It’s near Colmar, and there is much to see in that town, as well.  And…bring an empty suitcase!

14 thoughts on “European Patchwork Meeting • Final Post

  1. Thank you so much, Elizabeth! What a treat to relive this quilt show! I am already planning on going next year (benefit of living in Switzerland) and I’ll definitely plan 2 days!

    The highlight for me was Denise Labadie’s 4 day Seminar immediately after the quilt show. Now, I need to get busy and finish my project as the quilts we finish will be able to be entered in next year’s show! 😉

    But the real joy of discovering this world of Patchwork goes far beyond the quilts but rests in the wonderful people I’ve met and relationships I’ve made–especially that chance meeting with you in the notions section of a department store in Geneva!

  2. Well, it’s been a truly enjoyable trip, by armchair, thanks to you!!! In this post, I just loved the home scene panels and most especially the quilts made in Germany. This world is certainly filled with some talented folks!!! Thank you again for sharing.

  3. I feel like you saved the best for last! One more incredible and inspiring than the next. Thank you for sharing, Elizabeth.

  4. It’s been quite nice to see so many beautiful and creative quilts from outside the US. This post has given me some ideas. Thanks for all the work you put into these posts. I’ve enjoyed them.

  5. I have so enjoyed your posts of this quilt show. Such wonderful, creative work. Thank you so much for sharing your visit!

  6. Those log cabin words are astounding. My brain can’t even figure how the maker figures them out. Other interesting quilts as well. Thanks for the virtual show.

  7. Again…..another beautiful sharing! I really enjoyed seeing all the works. I was especially drawn to the men’s ties and those incredible pineapple/logs.

  8. Those log cabin portraits are quite fascinating, aren’t they? Goodness knows what the inspiration was that led to them! One of my best friends loves Colmar! It has been on my list for some time, but I doubt I will get there now! Thanks for sharing your adventures with us! It must have been rather overwhelming, in the short time you had!

  9. What a wonderful experience. I am so happy you posted about this quilt exhibit. Such wonderful quilts. The log cabin quilts bring me back to one of the first quilting styles I sewed. I see I only scratched the surface of what log cabins can create. Thank you very much.
    (And I know what you meant about getting back into real life.)

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