A Look at the Quilts at Quilt Market 2016

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First, I need to report on the giveaway held in the last post–all your comments were terrific! and seemed to be a healthy range from “just the kids” to “adults have a great time, too.”  I really liked the ones that said to include them both–so now you know.

The winner was Number 7HalloweenGiveawayJune2106. . . and it was Leslie, so I’ll get those shipped out to her right away so she can keep going on her Halloween quilt.  She wrote: Leslie comment HalloweenI do miss the homemade donuts that our neighbor used to make and for which we, as children, would double back around for.  Now it’s only wrapped candies, and we Moms all sort even those for scary things, but I do like Leslie’s perspective.  Okay, here we go with the quilts.

QMBleiweiss_TuttiFruittiAlleyway1

Tutti-Frutti Alleyway, by Susan Bleiweiss.  She writes: “This quilt is part of my ongoing series of art quilts which celebrate the use of vibrant color and whimsical imagery.”QMBleiweiss_TuttiFruittiAlleyway2 QMBranjord_BlueprintLife15347 Redfox Circle. . . Blueprint of a Life, by Sandra Branford.  Her artist’s statement: “Using my collage skills, I created a fantasy story board of my imaginative home.  Through my original designs, I define myself and take the viewers on a journey through my mind. . . some wit, a few brains, and loads of imagination.”

QMBranjord_BlueprintLife2

And as an English teacher, I smiled when I saw the misspelling in this text.  (You’ll have to find it yourself, and no, it’s not “hors d’oeuvres.”) Whenever I find typos and misspellings in things I write, I die a little of embarrassment, so I understand how things can get overlooked.QMBrown_Triology

Trilogy, by Peggy Brown.  “My goal,” she writes, “was to start with a painted free-flowing design, add collage and overlays of more paint, and compose a well-designed and unique painting on fabric — an art quilt.”QMCoatesPerez_PinkBird1

Pink Bird, by Judy Coates Perez  (Check out the quilting in the following photos!)  She write that she likes “painting images inspired by nature, using photos of real birds as reference for a pose, then altering them graphically; simplifying details, creating new patterns, and choosing different colors to create unique stylized birds and plants.”QMCoatesPerez_PinkBird2 QMCoatesPerez_PinkBird3 QMCoatesPerez_PinkBird4 QMDaniels_LongWinter1

Long Winter Flower Basket Sampler, by Eileen Daniels.  During a “long, cold winter in Wisconsin” she “became addicted to embroidery.”  She writes that she “spent hours listening to podcasts by Jonathan Welton and to my husband reading books aloud as I designed and embroidered this quilt.”QMDaniels_LongWinter2

I noticed more embroidery in this show than I’ve seen before–a welcome addition!QMDaniels_LongWinter3 QMDay_CubanBallerina1

Cuban Ballerina, by Jennifer Day.  She writes: “This quilt is based on a photograph that I took of a ballerina with the National Cuban Ballet in Havana.  She is dancing in a wonderful old building built in the early 1900s that has fallen into ruin since 1959.  This quilt is a testament to the young ballerina who is gracing the building with her beauty in dance.”QMDay_CubanBallerina2

More threadwork, but this time by machine.  It was stunning.QMRehak_TeaforTwo1

Nancy Rehak‘s Tea for Two.  “Inspired by Cindy Needham,” she writes, “I took an old tablecloth of my mom’s and created a quilt.  It was a challenge for me to design my quilting to highlight the tablecloth.  I named it Tea for Two because my dad used to sing that song to us when we were little.”QMRehak_TeaforTwo2 QMRidgway_TreeTokyo

A Tree Grows in Tokyo, by Helen Ridgeway and her friends: Anita Crane, Mary Ann Hildebrand, Linda Humphrey, Marilyn Lampman, Holly Nelson, Bonnie Sprado and Barbara Woodman.  The artists’ statement reads: “This was a collaboration by the eight members of the Sew Be It Bee.  We each hand appliquéd a block from Kumiko Sudo’s book.  One of our members, Mary Ann Hildebrand, designed and made the tree, using a scrunching technique, and made the cherry blossoms out of Yo-yos from a synthetic fabric.”

QMShearer_EagertoLearn1

Gillian Shearer’s Eager to Learn – Afghanistan.  “In 2011, in Wakhan Corridor, Afghanistan, Ellend Jaskol recorded this image of two girls eager to learn at a new school in Sust,” she writes.  “They were studying in a temporary tent until the school was completed.  The power of educating girls is slowly breaking through.  ‘When you educate a girl, you educate a nation.’ ”
QMShearer_EagertoLearn2 QMSim_Journey1

Journey, by Grace Sim.  She writes that “This quilt allowed me to try techniques I have wanted to try for a long time — fabric manipulation, liberated blocks, crazy quilting, modern quilting, Broderie Perse, and the use of buttons and crystals.  I used them to form my favorite Italian landscape.”QMSim_Journey2 QMSim_Journey3 QMSim_Journey4

More quilts are coming.

I realized in doing this post that if a person desires to become a quilt artist, it’s pretty important that they create a place in space to reside: whether it be a blog page, or a gallery of images, or just a single place where people like me can go and search in order to read more about them. There are many platforms that can be used: Instagram, Pinterest, blogging, Tumblr, etc.

I was unsuccessful in a finding a couple of the above artists.  In this day and age of >instant< and >quick< and rushrushrush there is a tendency to overlook the long form of blogs.  But they become important when looking at the bigger picture, or, your journey as a quilter. So if you are just starting, you might consider building your own little place where people can find you.  While there may not be much more than four walls and a piece of carpet (where others might have several fully-furnished rooms), it will be your space.

13 thoughts on “A Look at the Quilts at Quilt Market 2016

  1. Can’t believe that these quilts were at market! They’re definitely show-worthy pieces… and the sort of quilts that make me shake my head in disbelief. They’re so over-the-top. Who are these quilters who have so much artistic skill?! Definitely not me. But I’m happy in my own little quilting world where simple quilts are good enough.

  2. Absolutely amazing work – thank you SOOO much for sharing these – how would we ever see them otherwise?! And once more I realize “I just sew” – these folks take it to another level entirely.

  3. What stunning work! That last one is truly amazing! I even recognise some of that circular/floral fabric which we both own a piece of! And I love that Afghanistan one- how true about teaching a girl!

  4. Beautiful quilts by talented artists! I love your comments at the end about creating a space so that people can find you. Thank you for sharing! What is the spelling error??

  5. So happy you posted these. I wasn’t able to spend the proper amount of time appreciating them while I was there!

  6. Show quilts such as the ones you’ve shared always make me realize just how very simple my own work is. But that’s not a bad thing because I don’t strive to make “show” quilts. I am happy playing with fabrics in my own way. The talent and skill involved in this level of quilting is truly stunning.

  7. Thank you for posting these quilts. It’s great to see the photos, especially the close ups. I saw plenty of photos of the merchant stalls at Quilt Market, but didn’t see any of these quilts on Instagram. It’s nice to know it wasn’t all about buying and selling.

  8. So many things to respond to in this post!

    – I made donuts and donut holes to pass out for Hallowe’en 2009 when we lived in a very small town. Only time I’ve ever made them but they were so good! (And worth the hot oil burn on my forehead too).
    – “I die a little of embarrassment” re: spelling errors, me too!
    – slow, and online. I started my blog in the fall and I’m part of the New Bloggers Quilt Hop that’s going on this month. It’s nice to share work with others.

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